Kenya

Coast & Parks

GuideBen Mugambi
DatesAny Time
Birding Days10
Ground Price£3000
$3899
€3600
Flight ex UK£450
Ben Mugambi
Ben Mugambi is one of Kenya's best birders. He knows the country and its wildlife intimately, and has formed his own company, primarily geared towards birdwatching. He has also worked as the Resident Ornithologist and Naturalist, as well as a Guest Relations Officer in a number of the top Kenyan and Tanzania Lodges, Camps and Hotels.
The trip begins on the coast. South of Mombasa is the forested Shimba Hills National Park, and then heading north, we reach the shore at Mida Creek and Sabaki Rivermouth, the mysterious Arabuko-Sokoke Forest and the plains north of Malindi.
In the forest, Sokoke Scops Owl, Sokoke Pipit, Clarke’s Weaver, Amani Sunbird and East Coast Akalat are all restricted in range, and are accompanied by Fischer’s Turaco, Green-headed Oriole, Madagascar and Asian Lesser Cuckoos, Four-coloured Bush-shrike and the strange Golden-rumped Elephant Shrew. On the creeks and shore, one can find African Skimmer, Saunder’s Tern, Crab Plover, Greater and Lesser Sandplovers, Madagascar Pratincole, Zanzibar Red Bishop and many more. The salt-flats north of Malindi are the home of the restricted-range Malindi Pipit. Heading inland, we go through Tsavo East National Park. Here are found Somali Ostrich, Kori and Buff-crested Bustards, Whitethroated Bee-eaters, Vulturine Guineafowl, Golden-breasted Starling, Orange-bellied Parrot, and Yellow-billed and Von der Decken’s Hornbills. Tsavo West is home to the restricted-range Red-naped Bush-shrike. En-route, we visit Taita Hills, with their endemic Taita Thrush, White-eye and Apalis, as well as Stripe-cheeked Greenbul, Yellow-throated Woodland Warbler and Striped Pipit.
Finally, we visit Amboseli National Park, under the shadow of Mt. Kilimanjaro, and with an impressive range of mammals, including Lion, Cheetah, Elephant and Hippo. Dependent on season, waterbirds can be plentiful, larks abound, and it is one of the best places to find the scarce regional endemic, Taveta Golden Weaver.